YUI Theater — Shawn Henry: “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Update”

By YUI TeamAugust 15th, 2007

Shawn Lawton Henry of the W3CLots of the work in technology that we do is based on standards. In the Web world many standards such as HTML, CSS and many more have been produced by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Shawn Lawton Henry gave us an update on the standards produced by W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative at Yahoo’s European headquarters in London. Where the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0 are very precise and contain a number of technical requirements that might be outdated, WCAG 2.0 takes a different approach. WCAG 2.0 takes a much more user-oriented approach. In her presentation, Shawn looks at the changes to WCAG as well as some of the other Accessibility standards produced by the W3C. Most of all she asks "how can I build more accessible sites?" so we can make the web a more friendly place.

A transcript of Shawn’s presentation is available on the WAI website. Many thanks to Shawn for allowing us to record the session and share it on YUI Theater.

Links:

  1. Web Accessibility Initiative Home <http://www.w3.org/WAI/>
  2. Just Ask: Integrating Accessibility Throughout Design <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/index.html>

13 Comments

  1. [...] After a little bit of pain with video editing and writing transcripts (man that’s hard work) Shawn’s video of her talk at Yahoo’s offices London is now available. She talks about the new version of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines and some of the other W3C accessibility standards. You can see the video and the transcript on the YUI blog. [...]

  2. [...] Shawn Henry: How can I build more accessible sites? Where the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0 are very precise and contain a number of technical requirements that might be outdated, WCAG 2.0 takes a different approach. WCAG 2.0 takes a much more user-oriented approach. (tags: Accessibility) [...]

  3. [...] YUI Theater — Shawn Henry: “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Update” Lots of the work in technology that we do is based on standards. In the Web world many standards such as HTML, CSS and many more have been produced by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Shawn Lawton Henry gave us an update on the standards produced by W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative at Yahoo’s European headquarters in London. Where the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0 are very precise and contain a number of technical requirements that might be outdated, WCAG 2.0 takes a different approach. WCAG 2.0 takes a much more user-oriented approach. In her presentation, Shawn looks at the changes to WCAG as well as some of the other Accessibility standards produced by the W3C. Most of all she asks “how can I build more accessible sites?” so we can make the web a more friendly place. [...]

  4. Dear friends and colleagues!

    I am so enthusiasted of the web accessibility initiative and its standards and guidelines

    fidelis.sk :)

  5. This presentation by Shawn is insightful on the WCAG2.0 standards. we at iridiumInteractive are doing couple of pilots to apply these standards.

  6. After a little bit of pain with video editing and writing transcripts (man that’s hard work) Shawn’s video of her talk at Yahoo’s offices London is now available. She talks about the new version of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines and some of the other W3C accessibility standards. You can see the video and the transcript on the YUI blog.

  7. [...] boost for table-less designs and being W3C compliant? I think here is a point we can start with: YUI Theater &mdash; Shawn Henry: “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Update” Yah… About accessibility & validation see my following post. __________________ Search Engine [...]

  8. I listened to the audio, and I must say, that w3 is not prepared for disabled at all. In my country most buildings are not prepared for people with serious disabilities and no one, really cares about web(which is very sad). I think that main thing would be collecting knowledge (wikipedia and others) in more accesible form (auto read audio or pdf-can be zoomed). I will try to write about it on my blog.

  9. Hi
    I’m from Poland. I was surfing and I found this articles. My friend is blind. He lost both ayes during cars acident. He had never done anthing on the computer. Listen!! Polish organisation for blind people founded him computer. He had to learn evrything from 0. I wanted to learn him how to use it. I would like to have somethink what helm me to help him. It’s very good blog.

    Best regards
    Zaklady Sportowe

  10. Just starting on what looks like quite a long road to making our site accessible (we’ve done some testing around colour blindness compatibility so far), and this video has been useful in understanding the context of the new guidelines. A list of the best tools, and best practise guidelines would be very useful, and I look forward to those becoming available.

  11. I am very pleased with the new standards set WCAG 2.0

    I know several people with disabilities, which are very low-assess the level of accessibility of web pages: the problems are to benefit from popular sites, blogs and stores.

    How to be good, since the whole world against people with disabilities continue to build a lot of obstacles, and the question of the availability of web pages is usually far in the list of priorities.

    I hope that more and more frequent publications on the subject will help to increase awareness and make the Internet accessible to all …

    We hope also to the relevant institutions, which will assist in the implementation of any new types of assistive technologies.

  12. I listened to the audio, and I want say, that w3 is for all.A list of the best tools, and best practise guidelines would be very useful, and I look forward to those becoming available.I would like to have somethink what helm me to help him. It’s very good blog.
    Regads

  13. Great post, David.

    When it comes down to it, I’m one of those in the “compelled by their clients” camp – and just budgeting a project involving creation of an HTML email can be extremely difficult.

    The amount of testing alone that is required often makes no sense to the client, considering it’s really just a web page – as they like to point out – and as you really can’t refute. And as you point out, it’s often difficult to even find resources gifted with the knowledge of old HTML formatting and layout techniques.